Koryusai Isoda

Koryusai was a samurai in the service of the Tsuchiya lords. On losing his feudal masters, he moved to Edo, where he turned his hand to ukiyo-e. From 1768, while his friend and role-model Harunobu was still alive, he called himself Haruhiro; not until 1771 did he assume the name of Koryusai. In about 1780 the honorary title Hokkyo – reserved for artists and scholars, though originally a rank in the priesthood – was bestowed upon him. Although his early works include many bijin-ga, where the influence of Harunobu is still marked, by the late 1770s he was creating oban-size fashion prints in a style of his own, depicting an urbane, realistic feminine type. Characteristics of his work are an emphasis on clothes, elaborate coiffures and powerful figure-drawing without background. Of his 600 or so woodblock prints, most are of courtesans and actors. Of all Japanese artists, it is probably he who created the most, and the most inventive, hashira-e, narrow, portrait format pictures and series, as well as large-format studies of birds. In his later years he devoted himself almost entirely to the more highly regarded ukiyo-e.

Koryusai Isoda

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9 Items

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