Mokuchu Urushibara

Growing up in Tokyo, he studied the art of carving and printing woodblocks. In 1907 Urushibara traveled to London to demonstrate Japanese printmaking at the Anglo-Japanese Exhibition. He lived in England and France until 1934, producing his own prints & teaching woodblock printmaking to many artists. His techniques are mentioned in Walter J. Phillips’s book on printmaking (who is thought to have received teachings from Urushibara). Urushibara carved and printed his own designs, and is best known for his Kacho-e prints of formally arranged flowers and wild life. In addition to his own work, Urushibara is also known for his collaborations with other artists. His most famous collaborations were with the English artist Frank Brangwyn.

In 1924, Urushibara produced a portfolio of small prints called Ten Woodcuts by Yoshijiro Urushibara after designs by Frank Brangwyn. Only 270 copies of this portfolio were produced. The start of World War II caused his return to Japan, but he kept in contact with his friends from Europe. In 1940, he again collaborated with Brangwyn on a portfolio entitled Leaves from the sketch books of Frank Brangwyn. Urushibara's prints were exhibited in the United States in 1945. It would be no overstatement to say he was an indispensable part of the European colour print movement, and that he had a profound influence on European colour printmakers.

Mokuchu Urushibara

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