Toyokuni III Utagawa, Kabuki Actors, Traditional Theatre, Snow Scene

£700
SKU
CMWA370
japanese art authenticityAuthenticity Guaranteed

Artist: Toyokuni III Utagawa (1786 - 1864)
Title: Kabuki actors, Ichikawa Danjuro VIII as Ashikaga Jiro no kimi, Genji
Publisher: Hamadaya Tokubei
Date: c.1847-1852
Size: (L) 37.2 x 25.5, (C) 37.1 x 25.5, (R) 37.3 x 25.6 cm

Original Japanese woodblock print.

Kunisada’s pictures reflect the culture of Japan in the years leading up to the country’s opening to the West. His first book illustrations were published in 1807, his first actor portrait the following year, alongside theatrical scenes and courtesans, yakusha-e was his preferred genre amidst all his popular and extensive output. As he painted very many of these, continuing the stout realism of his teacher, he acquired the sobriquet 'Yakusha-e no Kunisada' – Kunisada, the actor painter. From 1830 he continued the development of the Utagawa school, and from 1844 onwards signed his works Toyokuni III.

More Information
Print Format Triptych
Artist Name Toyokuni III Utagawa (Kunisada I)
Title Kabuki actors, Ichikawa Danjuro VIII as Ashikaga Jiro no kimi, Genji
Subject Kabuki Theatre
Dimensions (L) 37.2 x 25.5, (C) 37.1 x 25.5, (R) 37.3 x 25.6 cm
Condition Report Light wear and soiling, minor stains, horizontal centrefolds.

Toyokuni III Utagawa (Kunisada I)


Kunisada became a pupil of Toyokuni at the age of 15, and would later, after the latter’s death, assume his name. Kunisada’s pictures reflect the culture of Japan in the years leading up to the country’s opening to the West. His first book illustrations were published in 1807 and his first actor portrait the following year. Alongside theatrical scenes and courtesans, yakusha-e was his preferred genre amidst all his popular and extensive output. As he painted very many of these, continuing the stout realism of his teacher, he acquired the sobriquet “Yakusha-e no Kunisada” – Kunisada, the actor painter. In his numerous bijin-ga he clung to the deal of beauty prevalent at the time. While his style must be described as powerful and realistic, even coarsely so, his draughtsmanship and coloration are if anything monotonous and lacking finesse. From 1830 he continued the development of the Utagawa school, and from 1844 onwards signed his works Toyokuni III.